Learning from incidents seminar 5: Linking research and practice in learning from incidents, 11 June 2015, London

April 30, 2015

‘Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Learning from Incidents’ (IP-LFI) ESRC Seminar Series

11 June 2015, 10am-5pm (registration from 9:30am)

British Safety Council, 70 Chancellors Road, London W6 9RS (Hammersmith)

http://lfiseminars.ning.com/

You are invited to join an interdisciplinary group of researchers, practitioners and policy-makers from across Europe to explore how organisations can learn effectively from incidents across different sectors: energy, health, finance, construction and further afield.

So far this seminar series has explored key issues and gaps in the field of learning from incidents and has devised a set of preliminary research questions for an interdisciplinary R&D agenda (Seminar 1); examined various theoretical perspectives (Seminar 2) and methodological approaches (Seminar 3) to learning from incidents, from a range of disciplines across Engineering, Social and Life Sciences; and discussed examples and issues from policy and practice perspectives (Seminar 4).

In this fifth seminar we shall discuss how to strengthen the link between research and practice in learning from incidents (LFI). How could researchers, practitioners and policymakers collaborate to advance learning from incidents? What models and frameworks could effectively facilitate cooperation between these different stakeholders? What are the key priorities in learning from incidents and what could researchers do to help practitioners and policymakers improve LFI? How can LFI research be best communicated to practitioners and policymakers?

These questions will be addressed through the keynote talks and group discussions at this seminar. The keynote speakers are:

  • Dr Ritva Engeström, Senior Researcher, Centre for Activity Theory and Developmental Work Research, University of Helsinki, Finland: “Change Laboratory and Developmental Work Research”
  • Professor Eve Mitleton-Kelly, Director of the Complexity Research Group, London School of Economics and Political Science, UK: “Addressing complex problems through collaboration: A complexity theory approach”
  • Professor Lasse Gerrits, Chair in Governance of Complex and Innovative Technological Systems, Otto-Friedrich University, Bamberg, Germany: “Back to normal: Generating resilience in complex systems”

Participation is free. A buffet lunch will be provided.

Registration is required. To register for the seminar, please go to: https://eventbrite.co.uk/event/16547197112/

To join our LFI seminars community and to be kept up to date about the forthcoming events sign up at lfiseminars.ning.com http://lfiseminars.ning.com


Human Factors Foundation Training Course, 22-26 June 2015, London

April 9, 2015

A five-day training course to teach the fundamentals of Human Factors

This 5 day course delivers a comprehensive introduction into human factors for non-specialists. It provides a practical, engaging and interactive background to key topic areas, as well as to how human and organisational factors (HOF) can be applied within the workplace. Successful candidates will receive the Human Factors Foundation Certificate from the Energy Institute, allowing you to demonstrate the skills that have been gained during the course.

Why Human Factors?

The application of Human Factors principles is imperative for reducing occupational safety risks, improving productivity and ensuring the health of the workforce.  By implementing Human Factors principles, organisations can significantly reduce the risk of Human Error, which accounts for nearly 90% of accidents.

Learning outcomes

By the end of this course participants should understand:

  • The meaning of HOF and the scope of the subject
  • Common approaches to the management of HOF
  • The benefits of applying these approaches in a major accident hazard context
  • How HOF techniques can be integrated with other risk management activities

Price

Member price: £1,550.00 (+VAT) Non-member price: £1,800.00 (+VAT)

Click here for more information about the Human Factors Foundation training course

Click here to book online


Call for abstracts: Human factors application in major hazard industries, 6-7 October 2015

April 2, 2015

The deadline has been extended to submit an abstract for this biennial two-day conference, which returns in 2015 and will explore the practical application of human factors in the management of major accident hazards (MAH) in the energy and allied process industries. The event will focus on two key themes:

  • Assuring human factors performance: How can we ensure high performance through human and organisational factors?
  • Preventing incidents before they happen: How can we effectively investigate and analyse incidents and embed learning. How can we prevent incidents before they occur?

This conference, organised by the Energy Institute (EI)’s Human and Organisational Factors committee and the Stichting Tripod Foundation, will enable the learning and sharing of good practice between companies and industries, and offers excellent networking opportunities with delegates from around the world representing operating companies, suppliers, consultancies, and academia.

Call for abstracts

The deadline for submitting an abstract has been extended until 30 April 2015. Don’t miss this final opportunity to put forward your submission for an oral or poster presentation on the following key topics:

Assuring human factors performance:

  • Competence assurance
  • Non-technical skills and crew resource management (CRM)
  • Alarm handling
  • Risk analysis
  • Fatigue management
  • Other topics will be considered

Preventing incidents before they happen:

  • Safety culture
  • Human and organisational factors in Bow Tie diagrams
  • Embedding learning from incidents
  • Quality incident analysis
  • Other topics will be considered

To submit your contribution you will need to:

  • prepare an abstract of up to 500 words on the topic you intend to present in Microsoft Word format
  • indicate the presenter and co-authors with their affiliation and contact details
  • submit the abstract to Stuart King: e: sking@energyinst.org;

Submissions will be evaluated by the organising committee and successful entrants will be notified shortly after the submission deadline. Final deadline for abstract submission is Thursday 30 April 2015.

Sponsorship

A range of sponsorship opportunities are available for this event. For details please contact Luigi Fontana: e: lfontana@energyinst.org;


EI appearing at Hazards 25 conference – 13-15 May 2015, Edinburgh

April 1, 2015

The EI will be speaking at the IChemE Hazards 25 conference in May.  Steve Sharwen (ABB, member EI Area Classification Working Group) will provide an overview of key changes in the 4th edition of EI’s hazardous area classification publication (‘EI 15’); whereas Dr Ed Smith (DNV-GL, author to EI Human and Organisational Factors Committee) will describe work to prepare comprehensive guidance on learning from incidents.

EI will also have an exhibition stand, so come over and find out more about the technical work we are doing.

For full details on the conference programme, and to book your delegate place, visit the main conference website:

http://www.icheme.org/hazards25


EI issues invitation to tender on project S1502 ‘Guidance on control room alarm rationalisation’

March 23, 2015

The EI has issued an invitation to tender for a new project to produce guidance on how to conduct a human factors-oriented rationalisation of control room alarm systems.  This guidance aims to help companies bring the numbers of control room alarms down to a more manageable level (e.g. in order to meet EEMUA 201), to add in new alarms as the results of SIL/LOPA studies, and more generally to ensure that the alarms in place optimise operator situation awareness.

Consultants with experience in conducting control room alarm rationalisation/optimisation, and who are potentially interested in bidding for this project, are encouraged to contact Stuart King, Technical Products Manager, at e: sking@energyinst.org

 

 


New EI Guidance on ensuring control room operator (CRO) competence

January 13, 2015

Control room operators (CROs) perform a critical role in running normal operations, infrequent activities such as process shut downs, and handling abnormal events and emergencies. Ensuring a sufficient number of competent CROs are available on site is a key element of safety, and can contribute positively to productivity.

This new publication from the EI provides specific guidance on how to assure competence of CROs, particularly how to define competence standards, select training and development methods, assess CROs and maintain their competence once in post.

Challenges

The first challenge to training new CROs is in achieving an adequate pool of candidates from which to select CROs.  As CROs are often selected from field operators, this has a major implication; the recruitment of field operators should foresee the subsequent requirement for CROs.  This guide therefore advises that at least some field operators are recruited based on their potential to be CROs. Methods of assessing underpinning skills are cited in the guide to help identify potential CROs amongst current or candidate field operators.

The second challenge is that training someone to become a CRO is a long process involving the identification of the tasks a CRO needs to undertake, the competencies required, and how to best train and assess those competencies (e.g. using classroom or on-the-job training).  Given that people do not become established CROs overnight, an incremental approach to competence development is needed, progressing from beginners to established and then to advanced CROs. Guidance is provided on the formulation of an incremental approach to development, combining taught and structured on the job learning.

As the training of CROs is an expensive undertaking, the third challenge is retaining CROs once they are in post.  There are many aspects of retaining people. This guide firstly focuses on providing CROs with a structured route for advancement, providing people with the scope for further development once they are in post. Learning and further qualification opportunities may be provided and CROs encouraged and enabled to make use of these opportunities. In addition, creating a positive working environment through practical procedures, ergonomic equipment, supportive supervision and change management all contribute to staff retention as well as help reduce operator error.

The guidance is consistent with common models of competence management, but offers guidance that is specific to CROs.  This guide presents a full lifecycle view of CROs, from the creation of a pool of candidates to advancement of their competence when in post.  Extensive annexes provide practical tools, such as checklists for assessing the organisation’s arrangements for managing CRO competence, job aids for identifying CRO competencies, as well as example CRO competencies (and methods for training and assessment of those competencies) for routine, infrequent, abnormal and emergency operations.

This publication will be of interest for those who have a responsibility for ensuring the competence of CROs, including managers and supervisors of CROs and relevant members of human resources, talent management and learning and development teams.

How to access this publication

Guidance on ensuring control room operator (CRO) competence (1st edition, December 2014), available as a free download, or priced hard-copy publication.  After following the link, sign in to the energypublishing.org website to download.


High Reliability Organisations conference, 20 January 2015, London

December 9, 2014

Incidents over recent years have highlighted the importance of an organisation being able to demonstrate a top level safety performance. This has led to increased interest by senior leaders in High Reliability Organisations (HROs), characterised as organisations which aim to maintain excellent performance over long periods of time.

This event, hosted by the IChemE Safety and Loss Prevention Special Interest Group, will bring together speakers from a number of different organisations to share experience in working towards becoming a HRO. It will be of particular interest to senior managers interested in improving their organisations approach to process safety.

Speakers include Judith Hackitt (Chair of the Health and Safety Executive) and Helen Rycraft (International Atomic Energy Agency, and EI Human and Organisational Factors Committee member).

You can book your place at the event webpage.